MISS Programme

MELBOURNE IRISH STUDIES SEMINARS
An Inter-University Forum for Irish and Irish-Australian Studies

MISS has returned to Newman College, in the Jabiru Room in the Academic Centre, while also providing online access via Zoom. We follow all current Government regulations. Zoom links will be sent out a day before seminars. While most MISS talks will be on Tuesdays, the times may vary depending on availability of speaker and space at Newman. Please RSVP to dianne.hall [at] vu.edu.au if you would like to attend online. Recordings will be provided where possible on this page. General queries may be addressed to melbirishstudies [at] gmail.com

SEMINAR PROGRAMME

Semester 2, 2022

Tuesday 11th October, 2022 at 4:30pm (AEDT), 5:30am (GMT)
Rhys Ryan, 2022 Russell Beedles Performing Arts Fellow SLV
Na Trí Céilithe: Revisiting the dances of Melbourne’s Gaelic concerts in the early twentieth century

Tuesday 13th September, 2022 at 6:30pm (AEST), 9:30am (GMT)
Dr Damian Gleeson, 2022 Australian Religious History Fellow, SLNSW
Irish convicts and penal Catholicism: New evidence from the Therry Collection

Tuesday 23rd August, 2022 at 6:30pm (AEST), 9:30am (GMT)
Dr Matthew Grubits, Charles Sturt University
The Crisis of Captain Moonlite: Andrew George Scott in Australia

Semester 1, 2022

Tuesday 19th July, 2022 at 6:30pm (AEST), 9:30am (GMT)
Dr Tara McEvoy, Queen’s University, Belfast
Seamus Heaney in Australia

Tuesday 10th May, 2022 at 6:30pm (AEST), 9:30am (GMT)
Dr Jennifer McLaren
“This vile place”. An Irish Family in Trinidad in the Revolutionary Atlantic

Tuesday 22nd March, 2022 at 6:30pm (AEDT), 7:30am (GMT)
Dr Jimmy H. Yan, University of Melbourne
Contentious Routes: Ireland Questions, Radical Political Articulations and Settler Ambivalence in (White) Australia, c. 1909 – 1923


2021 Seminar Programme

Semester 2, 2021

Tuesday 30th November, 2021 at 6:00pm (AEDT)
Dr Chloé Diskin-Holdaway, University of Melbourne
Becoming Aussie: Investigating accent change in the Irish community in Melbourne

Tuesday 28th September, 2021 at 7:30pm (AEST)
Prof. Fearghal McGarry and Dr Darragh Gannon, Queen’s University Belfast
Ireland 1922 : Independence, Partition, Civil War

Tuesday 14th September, 2021 at 6:30pm (AEST)
Prof. Emerit. Peter Kuch, University of Otago
The Sydney Theatre and the Irish play in the 1830s

Tuesday 10th August, 2021 at 6:30pm (AEST)
A/Prof. Katie Barclay, University of Adelaide
Men on Trial: Performing emotion, embodiment and identity in Ireland, 1800-45

Semester 1, 2021

Tuesday 29th June, 2021 at 6:30pm (AEST)
Dr Jeff Kildea, Dr Perry McIntyre and Dr Richard Reid
To Foster an Irish Spirit – writing the centenary history of the Irish National Association of Australasia

Tuesday 18th May, 2021 at 6:30pm (AEST)
Dr Sophie Cooper, Teaching Fellow in Irish History, University of Leicester
Women and the shaping of Irish identities in Melbourne 1857-1920

Tuesday 20th April, 2021 at 6:30pm (AEST)
Clive Probyn, Emeritus Professor of English, Monash University.
Anglo-Irish roads to Jonathan Swift

Tuesday 23rd March, 2021 at 12:00 noon (AEDT)
Prof. Jane McGaughey, Concordia University, Canada.
“These raving maniacs”: Gender, Ethnicity, and the Irish in Canadian Colonial Lunatic Asylums, 1832-1868


UPCOMING SEMINARS

Details for any upcoming seminars are listed immediately below. Recordings and details of past seminars are provided further down the page.


NEWMAN COLLEGE

Seminars are held in the JABIRU ROOM in the Academic Centre at Newman College, Swanston Street, Carlton. After seminars the speaker usually joins any interested audience members for dinner at a local cafe or hotel. Queries about the seminar series may be directed to any of the MISS convenors: Philip Bull (La Trobe University), Frances Devlin-Glass (Deakin University), Dianne Hall (Victoria University), Elizabeth Malcolm (University of Melbourne), or Ronan McDonald (University of Melbourne)


RECORDINGS

19 July 2022 | Dr Tara McEvoy
Seamus Heaney in Australia
10 May 2022 | Dr Jennifer McLaren
“This vile place”. An Irish Family in Trinidad in the Revolutionary Atlantic
30 November 2021 | Dr Chloé Diskin-Holdaway
Becoming Aussie: Investigating accent change in the Irish community in Melbourne
28 September 2021 | Prof. Fearghal McGarry and Dr Darragh Gannon
Ireland 1922 : Independence, Partition, Civil War
14 September 2021 | Prof. Emerit. Peter Kuch
The Sydney Theatre and the Irish play in the 1830s
10 August 2021 | A/Prof. Katie Barclay
Men on Trial: Performing emotion, embodiment and identity in Ireland, 1800-45
29 June 2021 | Dr Richard Reid, Dr Jeff Kildea, and Dr Perry McIntyre
To Foster an Irish Spirit – writing the centenary history of the Irish National Association of Australasia
18 May 2021 | Dr Sophie Cooper
Women and the shaping of Irish identities in Melbourne 1857-1920
20 April 2021 | Prof. Clive Probyn
Anglo-Irish roads to Jonathan Swift
23 March 2021 | Prof. Jane McGaughey
“These raving maniacs”: Gender, Ethnicity, and the Irish in Canadian Colonial Lunatic Asylums, 1832-1868
8 December 2020 | Prof. Jeff Kildea
Hugh Mahon’s expulsion from the Australian parliament in 1920
1 December 2020 | Dr Robert Lindsey
Vincent Hearnes and the cultural landscape of Irish Australia
17 November 2020 | Dr Craig Pett
The death of Swift’s printer John Harding: new evidence that implicates Swift
13 October 2020 | Prof. Sonja Tiernan
Commemorating controversy: Women and the shaping of Modern Ireland

PAST SEMINARS

MISS: Melbourne’s Gaelic Concerts

11 October 2022. Rhys Ryan’s creative fellowship at the State Library of Victoria examines original manuscripts documenting the annual céilithe held in Melbourne in the early twentieth century. By focusing on the specific dances performed at these concerts and the context in which they occurred, his research considers how, in a period of burgeoning Gaelic cultural consciousness, these choreographies both preserved and promulgated Irish identity throughout the diaspora.

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MISS: Irish Convicts and Penal Catholicism

11 September 2022. Fr John Joseph Therry, one of two official Roman Catholic priests appointed to colonial New South Wales in 1820, is widely credited as the ‘Founder of the Catholic Church in Australia’. This presentation draws upon correspondence and case studies from the extensive Fr John Joseph Therry Collection held at the State Library of New South Wales to challenge dominant themes in early Irish-Australian historiography, including the religiosity and contributions by convicts and emancipists to the fledgling Catholic Church, and Therry’s role as a community as well as spiritual leader.

Keep Reading

MISS: The Crisis of Captain Moonlite

23 August 2022. Andrew George Scott was born in County Down, Ireland in 1845.  He was raised in a privileged family and as a member of the Irish Church.  After moving to New Zealand with his family, his father was employed as a lay reader for the Church of England.  Shortly afterwards, Scott relocated to Australia and was himself employed as a lay reader in Victoria.  Scott’s father would go on to be ordained a priest and would serve his community in that capacity until his death.  Scott would go on to become one of Australia’s most notorious bushrangers (Captain Moonlite) before being hanged in Sydney at the age of 35. This paper explores how a young man who began his career in Australia in the service of the Church ended up as a convicted criminal.  It will be demonstrated that no account of the extraordinary trajectory of Scott’s life is adequate without regard for his personal religiosity.

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MISS: Seamus Heaney in Australia

19 July 2022. What kind of relationship did the Nobel Prize-winning poet Seamus Heaney have to Australia? How did his interactions with Australian poets shape his own work, and how has his poetry been received in the country? This paper will survey the relationship between Heaney and Australia: drawing on a range of archival material; exploring his friendships with writers including Vincent Buckley and Les Murray; and revisiting his 1994 appearance at the Melbourne Writers’ Festival, a significant moment in the poet’s career.

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MISS: An Irish Family in Trinidad

10 May 2022. Ulsterman John Black left Belfast after the Seven Years War to establish a Caribbean node in his family’s Atlantic network. He became enmeshed in transatlantic slavery in Grenada and Trinidad as a slave trader, planter and colonial administrator. His daughter Adele was born in Spanish Trinidad and spent most of her childhood in Belfast, before returning to the Caribbean to raise a family with her Irish husband. Both yearned for a return to Ireland but lived out their lives in Trinidad. Father and daughter illuminate the ways of being Irish in a dysfunctional, crisis-ridden slave society, with the complexities and challenges that entailed.

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