MISS Programme

MELBOURNE IRISH STUDIES SEMINARS
An Inter-University Forum for Irish and Irish-Australian Studies

MISS has returned to The Oratory at Newman College, while also providing online access via Zoom. Following current Government guidelines, those attending seminars in-person are required to check in with a QR code and show they are fully vaccinated. Zoom links will be sent out a day before seminars. This hybrid format will continue in 2022, with a new programme available here before semester starts. Please RSVP to dianne.hall [at] vu.edu.au if you would like to attend online. Recordings will be provided where possible on this page. General queries may be addressed to melbirishstudies [at] gmail.com

SEMINAR PROGRAMME

Semester 1, 2022

Tuesday 10th May, 2022 at 6:30pm (AEST), 9:30am (GMT)
Dr Jennifer McLaren
“This vile place”. An Irish Family in Trinidad in the Revolutionary Atlantic

Tuesday 22nd March, 2022 at 6:30pm (AEDT), 7:30am (GMT)
Dr Jimmy H. Yan, University of Melbourne
Contentious Routes: Ireland Questions, Radical Political Articulations and Settler Ambivalence in (White) Australia, c. 1909 – 1923


2021 Seminar Programme

Semester 2, 2021

Tuesday 30th November, 2021 at 6:00pm (AEDT)
Dr Chloé Diskin-Holdaway, University of Melbourne
Becoming Aussie: Investigating accent change in the Irish community in Melbourne

Tuesday 28th September, 2021 at 7:30pm (AEST)
Prof. Fearghal McGarry and Dr Darragh Gannon, Queen’s University Belfast
Ireland 1922 : Independence, Partition, Civil War

Tuesday 14th September, 2021 at 6:30pm (AEST)
Prof. Emerit. Peter Kuch, University of Otago
The Sydney Theatre and the Irish play in the 1830s

Tuesday 10th August, 2021 at 6:30pm (AEST)
A/Prof. Katie Barclay, University of Adelaide
Men on Trial: Performing emotion, embodiment and identity in Ireland, 1800-45

Semester 1, 2021

Tuesday 29th June, 2021 at 6:30pm (AEST)
Dr Jeff Kildea, Dr Perry McIntyre and Dr Richard Reid
To Foster an Irish Spirit – writing the centenary history of the Irish National Association of Australasia

Tuesday 18th May, 2021 at 6:30pm (AEST)
Dr Sophie Cooper, Teaching Fellow in Irish History, University of Leicester
Women and the shaping of Irish identities in Melbourne 1857-1920

Tuesday 20th April, 2021 at 6:30pm (AEST)
Clive Probyn, Emeritus Professor of English, Monash University.
Anglo-Irish roads to Jonathan Swift

Tuesday 23rd March, 2021 at 12:00 noon (AEDT)
Prof. Jane McGaughey, Concordia University, Canada.
“These raving maniacs”: Gender, Ethnicity, and the Irish in Canadian Colonial Lunatic Asylums, 1832-1868


UPCOMING SEMINARS

Details for any upcoming seminars are listed immediately below. Recordings and details of past seminars are provided further down the page.


NEWMAN COLLEGE

After seminars the speaker usually joins any interested audience members for dinner at a local cafe or hotel. Queries about the seminar series may be directed to any of the MISS convenors: Philip Bull (La Trobe University), Frances Devlin-Glass (Deakin University), Dianne Hall (Victoria University), Elizabeth Malcolm (University of Melbourne), or Ronan McDonald (University of Melbourne)


RECORDINGS

10 May 2022 | Dr Jennifer McLaren
“This vile place”. An Irish Family in Trinidad in the Revolutionary Atlantic
30 November 2021 | Dr Chloé Diskin-Holdaway
Becoming Aussie: Investigating accent change in the Irish community in Melbourne
28 September 2021 | Prof. Fearghal McGarry and Dr Darragh Gannon
Ireland 1922 : Independence, Partition, Civil War
14 September 2021 | Prof. Emerit. Peter Kuch
The Sydney Theatre and the Irish play in the 1830s
10 August 2021 | A/Prof. Katie Barclay
Men on Trial: Performing emotion, embodiment and identity in Ireland, 1800-45
29 June 2021 | Dr Richard Reid, Dr Jeff Kildea, and Dr Perry McIntyre
To Foster an Irish Spirit – writing the centenary history of the Irish National Association of Australasia
18 May 2021 | Dr Sophie Cooper
Women and the shaping of Irish identities in Melbourne 1857-1920
20 April 2021 | Prof. Clive Probyn
Anglo-Irish roads to Jonathan Swift
23 March 2021 | Prof. Jane McGaughey
“These raving maniacs”: Gender, Ethnicity, and the Irish in Canadian Colonial Lunatic Asylums, 1832-1868
8 December 2020 | Prof. Jeff Kildea
Hugh Mahon’s expulsion from the Australian parliament in 1920
1 December 2020 | Dr Robert Lindsey
Vincent Hearnes and the cultural landscape of Irish Australia
17 November 2020 | Dr Craig Pett
The death of Swift’s printer John Harding: new evidence that implicates Swift
13 October 2020 | Prof. Sonja Tiernan
Commemorating controversy: Women and the shaping of Modern Ireland

PAST SEMINARS

MISS: An Irish Family in Trinidad in the Revolutionary Atlantic

10 May 2022. Ulsterman John Black left Belfast after the Seven Years War to establish a Caribbean node in his family’s Atlantic network. He became enmeshed in transatlantic slavery in Grenada and Trinidad as a slave trader, planter and colonial administrator. His daughter Adele was born in Spanish Trinidad and spent most of her childhood in Belfast, before returning to the Caribbean to raise a family with her Irish husband. Both yearned for a return to Ireland but lived out their lives in Trinidad. Father and daughter illuminate the ways of being Irish in a dysfunctional, crisis-ridden slave society, with the complexities and challenges that entailed.

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MISS: Ireland Questions, Radical Articulations & Settler Ambivalence

22 March 2022. The transnational history of the ‘Ireland Question’ in the imperial and ethico-political imaginary of radical and labour movements in (White) Australia during the ‘Irish revolutionary period’, broadly conceived, are explored in this paper by Dr. Jimmy Yan. It traces the contestation of ‘Ireland’ as a political signifier, with attention to its constitutive differences, transnational circuitries, utopian investments, relations of recognition and desire, and articulatory practices. Combining attention to settler-colonial difference with the discursive articulation of political forms, it situates the ‘Ireland Question’ firstly in relation to the political as a signifier of settler ambivalence, and secondly to politics as a social movement.

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MISS: Becoming Aussie. Accent change in the Irish community

30 November 2021. Research into sociolinguistics shows accents are not fixed or static and can change throughout the lifespan. The way we speak can also shift depending on who we are speaking to, what we are speaking about, and how we position ourselves in given moments in interaction with others. These changes can be more apparent among highly mobile individuals, such as migrants, expatriates, or international students, who frequently move between cities, regions, and countries. In this seminar Dr Chloé Diskin-Holdaway will explore the role that identity and motivation can play in both the conscious and unconscious processes behind our speech production and perception.

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MISS Online: Ireland 1922. Independence, Partition, Civil War

28 September 2021. This seminar will be about the forthcoming collection of articles, Ireland 1922: Independence, Partition, Civil War, edited by Darragh Gannon and Fearghal McGarry and to be published by Royal Irish Academy. The collection examines 1922 through key incidents and different perspectives including material culture, violence, gender, politics and the diaspora. A pivotal year in Irish history, 1922 saw the ratification of the Anglo-Irish Treaty leading to the establishment of the Irish Free State, the outbreak of the Irish Civil War, and the consolidation of partition as Northern Ireland opted out of the Free State settlement.

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MISS Online: The Sydney Theatre and the Irish play in the 1830s

14 September 2021. Prof. Peter Kuch on The Sydney Theatre and the Irish play in the 1830s. For the most part, Irish roles in the plays produced at the Sydney Theatre Royal throughout the 1830s are notable for their wit, whimsy, sociability and fortuitous problem solving. But as the decade progressed, a reaction set in that saw the re-emergence of the Stage Irishman. The story of the Irish on the Sydney stage throughout the 1830s is a story of Irish character roles and ‘ersatz Irish’ commercial forms. 

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