CFP: RISE. Review of Irish Studies in Europe

CFP: RISE. Review of Irish Studies in Europe

1 March 2023. Remapping Irish Literary and Cultural Landscapes in the Mid-Twentieth Century. This special issue of RISE defines mid-twentieth century as from the 1930s to the 1970s—roughly coinciding with the conservative years of “de Valera’s Ireland,” starting from Fianna Fáil entering government in 1932, up until Seán Lemass’s programmes of economic expansion which led to Ireland’s European Economic Community membership in 1973. It understands literary and cultural landscapes in the broadest term: horizontally as a geographic space with borders real and imagined; vertically as a space where high and low cultures clash and commingle. We welcome studies that examine the various forms of border-crossing—geographic, linguistic, generic—that contribute to a fuller map of Irish literature and culture in the mid-twentieth century. We especially appreciate scholarship that expands traditional disciplinary boundaries, from the fields of history, film, media, visual culture, and digital humanities.

CFP: Multilingual legacies of Ireland’s revolution

CFP: Multilingual legacies of Ireland’s revolution

10 December 2022. Ireland’s revolutionary period (1916–1923) is generally studied and approached in terms of the English language. This does not reflect the rich linguistic landscape of early-twentieth century Ireland: large sections of the country were still Irish speaking, the travelling Mincéir community were strongly grounded in their own linguistic traditions, while regional dialects and language varieties, including Ulster Scots, were not just a marker of geographic background but also of socioeconomic class. Ireland was also home to various ethnic communities, including migrants from France, Germany, Switzerland, as well as a vibrant Jewish community from Russia. This symposium invites contributions from scholars working across different languages. It aims to explore how the events of the Irish revolution and civil war were conceived and reconceived in various languages at home and abroad at different points in time and during different political moments. In an increasingly diverse Ireland, what can we learn from these multilingual legacies?

CFP: 10th Celtic Students Conference

CFP: 10th Celtic Students Conference

CFP: 10th Celtic Students Conference, 30 March - 1 April 2023, University of Glasgow (In-Person & Online). The Association of Celtic Students will be holding its tenth annual conference from the 30th March to the 1st April 2023. Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and in the interest of greater accessibility, this year’s conference will be a hybrid event. Guests are warmly invited to attend in-person presentations at the University of Glasgow, or to attend online if they prefer. All arrangements are subject to national health advice and restrictions and may change as the situation develops. We welcome presentations in English and in any of the Celtic languages. We accept papers from current students and recent graduates on any aspect of Celtic Studies, as well as any topic associated with any of the Celtic languages, peoples, literatures, histories, and/or cultures. Conference papers should be between 15-20 minutes in length.

CFP: Irish History Students

CFP: Irish History Students

The Irish History Students’ Association has launched a new podcast, to provide an informal platform for students of history to network with the wider academic community. The focus of each episode will be to disseminate new student research, which could take the form of a one-to-one conversation with an experienced scholar in your field, or a panel discussion bringing together students examining a similar research topic. Students and early-career researchers in Ireland studying any historical theme or period, along with those researching Irish history abroad, are invited to submit a proposal. The deadline for the first round of proposals is 12 May 2022.

CFP: Catching Joyce

CFP: Catching Joyce

15 - 16 June 2022. We invite participants to reflect on the theme of ‘catching’ Joyce from any perspective. James Joyce has sometimes been caught – in the sense of confined – by a specialist Joyce industry. We are keen that this conference is inclusive and liberating in all senses, and we welcome those who don’t regard themselves as Joyceans. Traditional 15-20 minutes presentations are welcome. So too roundtables, seminars or themed group presentations amounting to 15-20 minutes per participant. Please abstracts by 1 April 2022.

CFP: Conference for Irish Studies

CFP: Conference for Irish Studies

Another year disrupted. Another unforeseen turning in the widening gyre. For this year’s conference, which will be fully online, we seek papers, panels, and roundtables on the following, as well as any or all other topics in Irish Studies: Imagined and real Irish pasts; Speculative and potential Irish futures; Irish encounters with other fields of study; Imbricated Irish experiences; Teaching Irish Studies in new contexts.

CFP: Conflict and Ireland in the 19c.

CFP: Conflict and Ireland in the 19c.

24-25 June 2022. The 2022 SSNCI Conferences offers a unique opportunity to explore conflict as a critical lens and to bring together not just researchers from a range of disciplinary backgrounds and international and transnational perspectives. Papers are invited from researchers based around the world and in all disciplines that engage with the history of conflict relative to Ireland and Irish people in the nineteenth century.

CFP: Flann O’Brien Six

CFP: Flann O’Brien Six

VIth International Flann O'Brien Conference. 6 - 9 April 2022. Boston. Boston College is happy to host the VIth International Flann O’Brien Conference. After Vienna, Rome, Prague, Salzburg, and Dublin, this will be the first time Flanneurs will gather outside Europe. Delayed by a year due to Covid, the conference will take place in Boston from Wednesday evening, April 6, through Saturday evening, April 9, 2022. We offer a hearty advance welcome to Flannoraks for an opportunity to return, finally, to the delights of a face-to-face conference (sorry, no virtual or hybrid participation, but those who do come might encounter some form of virtual or augmented reality!). All are invited to respond to our Call for Papers. Please submit your proposal by the January 31 deadline. The title and theme of the conference—Flannagain: in far Amurikey—speak to the circumstances of its inception and its venue: our (hoped-for!) relief from the pandemic, and our location at the Hub of the Unified Stations.

CFP: Irish Civil War National Conference

CFP: Irish Civil War National Conference

15-18 June 2022, University College Cork will host the Irish Civil War National Conference, to mark the centenary of the opening of hostilities at the Four Courts in Dublin. Working with the Department of Culture, Heritage, and the Gaeltacht, this conference will align with the core principles of the Expert Advisory Group on Commemorations by encouraging, ‘multiple and plural’ perspectives on complex and contested events. The four-day conference will seek to explore political, social, cultural, military, and economic dimensions to the Irish Civil war.

CFP: Studies in Irish Capitalism

CFP: Studies in Irish Capitalism

A Special Issue of the Irish Studies Review. Vol.31, No.1 (February 2023). In the aftermath of the 2008 Credit Crisis, studies of capitalism made a rapid resurgence within American history-writing: works such as Sven Beckert’s Empire of Cotton, Bethany Moreton’s To Serve God and Walmart, Jonathan Levy’s Freaks of Fortune and Destin Jenkins’ Bonds of Inequality all raised serious questions not just about capitalism but also about adjacent issues of race, gender, religion, and the environment.